Week In Review: January 15 to January 21, 2012

This past week saw Points publish the first half of our popular “Points Toward The Presidency” [P.T.T.P.] series. We’ve also posted a potpourri of smaller articles ranging in length and tone. All are worthy of a look so, for your personal reference, please enjoy our Week In Review.

Sunday: We unofficially began P.T.T.P. by lamenting Jon Huntsman’s decision to drop out of the Republican primaries in “Jonny, We Hardly Knew Ye!”

Monday: We published the first part of Dr. Dessa Bergen-Cico’s fascinating look into the Vietnam-era work of Washington University sociologist Dr. Lee Robins. In “The ‘Lee Robins Study’ and Its Legacy, Part One,”  we’re introduced to Dr. Robins’ now-famous study of opiate use among U.S. servicemen during the Vietnam War. Joseph Gabriel augmented Dr. Bergen-Cico’s work with a brief reminder of former Massachusetts Governor (and future President?) Mitt Romney’s stance on medical marijuana.

Tuesday: Hump day saw the first official installment of P.T.T.P., as we profiled former Pennsylvania Governor – and Google Bomb target – Rick Santorum’s past and present attitudes toward drugs.  We’d like to take another opportunity to welcome Kelsey Harcledore, the head of the P.T.T.P. research bureau, to the fold.

Wednesday: We were treated to the second half of Dr. Bergen-Cico’s wonderful series on the “Lee Robins Study.”

Thursday: Once again, P.T.T.P. was foiled by an early drop-out, as we learned that former Texas Governor Rick Perry has exited the race for the G.O.P. nomination. Nonetheless, we cover Perry’s own history (or lack thereof) with drugs.

Friday: The end of the workweek saw Points get a little reflective, as Trysh Travis celebrated our first birthday with “The Sun is the Same in a Relative Way…”  We also posted our first “Friday Reads” column, where we proffered up a selection of long-form essays and podcasts for your end-of-week enjoyment.

Saturday: We got down Saturday with another installment of P.T.T.P., this time looking at the attitudes of the presumptive President of South Carolina, Stephen Colbert.