Special Announcement: The Points Online Library Project

Look, nobody's saying we'll be Trinity College...

Points‘ mission, in addition to providing readers with a regular opportunity to read new, insightful, and provocative content on the history of drugs and alcohol, is to help further develop  online research and publishing in general. In an age in which WordPress, Facebook, Twitter, and Tumblr are fundamentally altering the nature of academia – in both positive and negative ways – it is incumbent for sites like Points to play whatever small role they can in negotiating a working relationship between newer and older forms of research. To that end, we are delighted to announce an exciting new project that will bring the best online research material to current and future readers.

Over the next month, we will be developing the Points Online Library, a virtual repository for links to all manner of open source drug- and alcohol-related materials on the Web. The library will provide links to readily-available studies, one-off articles, periodical archives, PDF-format eBooks, all manner of video, and even pre-existing drug resource databases, all in an easily-searchable format for both casual exploration or serious perusal. Our goal is to facilitate online research by creating, promoting, and maintaining a centralized location for relevant and trustworthy academic resources.

You, the Points reader, can play an important role in the early development of this library, as we’ll be crowdsourcing our readers over the next month in an attempt to build up our holdings before we put the library online in May. We would appreciate it if any readers interested in helping with this project would pass along, either as a comment at the end of this article or in an e-mail, any sites, pages, or downloadable material you’d like to see in the Points library. We’ll be open to suggestions for the next three weeks and we urge you all to send us the links you’d like to see on our site. With your help, the Points library might be a significant resource in the field of drug and alcohol research.

9 thoughts on “Special Announcement: The Points Online Library Project

  1. Just trying to get the word out that I recently published my second ediition of Marijuana and the Bible thru createspace an amazon co. . google Marijuana and the Bible Jeff Brown

    sincerely Jeff Brown

  2. http://www.maps.org/resources/psychedelic_bibliography/

    This database combines the following resources:

    MAPS’ MDMA Literature Review with PDF copies of most papers, updated monthly.
    Albert Hofmann Foundation’s comprehensive bibliography on LSD and Psilocybin, 1943-1983 (over 4200 entries), originally gathered by Dr. Albert Hofmann for his personal use. The Albert Hofmann Foundation has granted permission to have these documents scanned into PDF format and made available on the Internet.
    Torsten Passie’s Psychedelic / Psycholytic Therapy Bibliography, a complete list of all studies of the therapeutic use of psychedelics from 1931-1995, preface by Dr. Leuner and introduction by Dr. Passie.
    Alexander Shulgin’s annotated and categorized MDMA bibliography (up to 1992).
    Psychedelics and the Dying, and Euphoria (4-methyl aminorex) bibliographies by David Goldstein.
    Medical Marijuana bibliography by David Pate.
    Papers by Alexander T. Shulgin, Ph.D., David E. Nichols, Ph.D., Dr. Richard Strassman.
    Note: Alexander Shulgin’s annotated and categorized MDMA bibliography (up to 1992) is searchable only through the expert interface. This avoids possible confusion in the simple interface from two entries for some of the same references, with those in MAPS’ MDMA literature review presenting the original abstract and PDF and those in Alexander Shulgin’s bibliography presenting his summary in place of the original abstract. All other references can be accessed through either the simple or the expert interface.

    Also available on the MAPS website

    MAPS has also scanned the entire collection of the issues of The Psychedelic Review, the journal started by the Harvard psychedelic research team of Ralph Metzner, Richard Alpert and Timothy Leary. Issue #1 was first published in June 1963 and the final issue, #11, was Winter 1970/1971. These issues contain some fascinating articles and can be found here and in MAPS’ WWW Psychedelic Bibliography in the near future.

      • Sorry. The sugar reference was a reply to the question about a cookie addiction in an earlier post. Re LSD, may I ask whether there is a scholarly (not journalistic) history of LSD in America or elsewhere?

  3. Suggest including materials available only by subscription. Probably most researchers have access to a major research library via the Internet. My university library is not unique in its acquisitions policy favoring materials that are available 24/7. Of course, many resources are available without a library as an intermediary (such as Google Books).

  4. International resources:
    The International Scientific forum on alcohol research via http://www.alcoholforum4profs.org
    Releases ciritiques of emerging research on alcohol and health by its 39 medics and professors who are specialsts ina lcohol and heath who are its members. Hosted by Bosotn University Medical School with members across the world.

    AIM Alcohol in Moderation hosts a global database of summaries and programmes relevant to the social, scientific and medical aspects of alcohol consumption via http://www.alcoholinmoderation.com
    A monthly journal is published ( available via subscription info@aim-digest.com) but key papers and programmes are available free of charge and catalogues by subject via http://www.alcoholinmoderation.com consumers are led to country speciific responsible drinking guideliens via a world portal http://www.drinkingandyou.com

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