Points Bibliography: Drugs, Addiction, and Other Diseases

Editor’s Note:  These entries are part of an ongoing drug-related dissertation bibliography being compiled by Jonathon Erlen. They were formerly published in the Social History of Alcohol and Drugs journal but are now periodically featured on the Points blog. For more information, contact Dr. Erlen through the above link.

Lung Cancer Stigma: Associated Variables and Coping Strategies

Author: Criswell, Kevin R.

Abstract: Lung cancer stigma is a burgeoning area of literature, yet two important questions remain unanswered: a) What are the associations between lung cancer stigma and psychosocial outcomes across lung cancer survivors with different smoking histories and b) how would lung cancer survivors describe their experience of coping strategies they utilize to cope with lung cancer stigma. This dissertation presents two studies that seek to answer the above-mentioned questions: a) a quantitative study that describes the rates of Personal Responsibility, Regret, and Medical Stigma and the associations between the above-mentioned constructs and psychosocial outcomes; and b) a qualitative study of coping strategies that lung cancer survivors reported utilizing in response to lung cancer stigma. Results from the quantitative study suggest that, while current and former smokers report significantly greater rates of Personal Responsibility and Regret when compared to never smokers, smoking status did not significantly affect the level of Medical Stigma reported by lung cancer survivors. The most common themes extracted from the qualitative data were coping strategies involving education, avoidance, support, helping others, acceptance, and assertive communication. Further research is needed to investigate exactly how lung cancer stigma relates to psychosocial outcomes As future interventions geared towards lung cancer stigma are developed and tested, it will be important to a) measure lung cancer stigma and its associated constructs (e.g., regret, guilt/shame, personal responsibility) with instruments that are firmly rooted in testable theoretical frameworks, b) track psychosocial outcome variables and their changes as a result of the treatment response via the intervention, c) and observe any differences in how stigma variables (e.g., perceived stigma and internalized stigma) might be associated differently with outcome variables and change over time differently depending on smoking history (e.g., comparing outcomes between ever vs. never smokers).

Publication year: 2016

ISBN: 9781339312569

Advisor: Owen, Jason E.

Committee members: Arechiga, Adam L.; Thoreson, Laura; Vermeersch, David

University/institution: Loma Linda University

Department: Psychology

 

An Exploratory Study of the Psychometric Analysis of the Depression/Anxiety Negative Affect (DANA) Scale Used for Progress Monitoring in an Inpatient Substance Abuse Group Treatment Setting

Author: Sharma, Tania

Abstract: Progress monitoring in the treatment of Substance Use Disorders (SUD) has been slowly evolving and has typically relied on a few brief measures such as the Outcome Rating Scale (ORS) and the Session Rating Scale (SRS)/Group Session Rating Scale (GSRS). The Depression/Anxiety Negative Affect (DANA) scale, a recently developed progress monitoring measure, has shown good psychometric properties in individual counseling settings (Meier, 2012). This exploratory, naturalistic study of change in Negative Affect was the first to use the DANA Scale in a SUD inpatient group treatment program. Fourteen therapists at the Stutzman Addiction Treatment Center provided 377 DANA Scale ratings for 33 residents and obtained 305 ORS, 263 GSRS and 26 SRS ratings. The findings of the current study revealed that the DANA scale is a brief progress monitoring measure with adequate reliability for use in SUD individual and group counseling settings. Limitations included inter- and intra-clinician inconsistencies in completing the DANA Scale, resulting in lack of convergent validity with other measures and suggests additional clinician training could improve the utility of the DANA. An important implication of this study was that the DANA Scale provides clinicians an opportunity to track client Avoidance of Negative Affect, and hence, has a unique applicability for an SUD population.

 

 

Publication year: 2016

 

ISBN: 9781369185478

Advisors: Janikowski, Timothy P.; Meier, Scott T.

Committee member: Rutter, Michael E.

University/institution: State University of New York at Buffalo

Department: Counseling, School and Educational Psychology

 

The Impact of Marijuana Use on Memory in Patients with HIV/AIDS

Author: Skalski, Linda Marie

Abstract: The most robust neurocognitive effect of marijuana use is memory impairment. Memory deficits are also high among persons living with HIV/AIDS, and marijuana use among this population is disproportionately common. Yet research examining neurocognitive outcomes resulting from co-occurring marijuana and HIV is virtually non-existent. The primary aim of this case-controlled study was to identify patterns of neurocognitive impairment among HIV patients who used marijuana compared to HIV patients who did not use drugs by comparing the groups on domain T-scores. Participants included 32 current marijuana users and 37 non-drug users. A comprehensive battery assessed substance use and neurocognitive functioning. Among the full sample, marijuana users performed significantly worse on verbal memory tasks compared to non-drug users and significantly better on attention/working memory tasks. A secondary aim of this study was to test whether the effect of marijuana use on memory was moderated by HIV disease progression, but these models were not significant. This study also examined whether the effect of marijuana use was differentially affected by marijuana use characteristics, finding that earlier age of initiation was associated with worse memory performance. These findings have important clinical implications, particularly given increased legalization of this drug to manage HIV infection.

 

Publication year: 2016

ISBN: 9781369025989

Advisors: Meade, Christina S.; Sikkema, Kathleen J.

Committee members: Curry, John F.; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Schramm-Sapyta, Nicole L.

University/institution: Duke University

Department: Psychology and Neuroscience

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Points Bibliography: Marijuana, Memory, and Craving

Editor’s Note:  These entries are part of an ongoing drug-related dissertation bibliography being compiled by Jonathon Erlen. They were formerly published in the Social History of Alcohol and Drugs journal but are now periodically featured on the Points blog. For more information, contact Dr. Erlen through the link above.

Cannabis Users’ Experience of Cannabis Craving: A Test of the Cue-Reactivity Model

Author: Loflin, Mallory J. E.

Abstract: Despite craving’s emphasis in treatment programs, little research has been conducted that specifically focuses on cannabis craving. Cannabis use, however, is the second most commonly cited reason for entering treatment for substance abuse and dependency. An understanding of how cannabis users experience craving is necessary. The current study compared heavy/daily cannabis users with infrequent users on measures of craving following presentation of cannabis cues. Hypotheses predicted changes in physiological (heart rate, galvanic skin response) and cognitive (simple reaction time, attentional bias) correlates of craving, and increased self-reported craving following cannabis cue exposure. Results found no significant increase in most indicators of craving. Only galvanic skin response was impacted by presentation of drug cues. Findings are inconsistent with previously published work on cannabis craving, suggesting the need for further research.

Publication year: 2016

ISBN: 9781339998435

Advisor: Earleywine, Mitch

Committee members: Gordis, Elana; Hormes, Julia

University/institution: State University of New York at Albany

Department: Clinical Psychology

 

The Impact of Marijuana Use on Memory in Patients with HIV/AIDS

Author: Skalski, Linda Marie

Abstract: The most robust neurocognitive effect of marijuana use is memory impairment. Memory deficits are also high among persons living with HIV/AIDS, and marijuana use among this population is disproportionately common. Yet research examining neurocognitive outcomes resulting from co-occurring marijuana and HIV is virtually non-existent. The primary aim of this case-controlled study was to identify patterns of neurocognitive impairment among HIV patients who used marijuana compared to HIV patients who did not use drugs by comparing the groups on domain T-scores. Participants included 32 current marijuana users and 37 non-drug users. A comprehensive battery assessed substance use and neurocognitive functioning. Among the full sample, marijuana users performed significantly worse on verbal memory tasks compared to non-drug users and significantly better on attention/working memory tasks. A secondary aim of this study was to test whether the effect of marijuana use on memory was moderated by HIV disease progression, but these models were not significant. This study also examined whether the effect of marijuana use was differentially affected by marijuana use characteristics, finding that earlier age of initiation was associated with worse memory performance. These findings have important clinical implications, particularly given increased legalization of this drug to manage HIV infection.

ISBN: 9781369025989

Advisor: Meade, Christina S.   Sikkema, Kathleen J.

Committee member: Curry, John F.; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Schramm-Sapyta, Nicole L.

University/institution: Duke University

Department: Psychology and Neuroscience

 

The Influence of Doctoral Psychology Trainees’ Personal Cannabis Use, Perceptions of Cannabis’ Risks, and Attitudes toward Substance Use on Ability to Identify Cannabis Use Disorder

Author: Stratyner, Alexandra G.

Abstract: The incidence of cannabis use disorder is increasing across the United States as a function of increased cannabis use (Hasin et al., 2015); accordingly, it is critical that mental healthcare professionals be able to accurately identify cannabis use disorder. In light of this imperative, the current study explored potential barriers to diagnosing cannabis use disorder among doctoral psychology trainees. Participants (N = 123) were doctoral students in clinical psychology, counseling psychology, and related disciplines. Utilizing a quasi-experimental analogue design, the study examined whether doctoral psychology trainees’ personal cannabis use predicted their perceptions of the risks of cannabis use and attitudes toward substance use. Additionally, the study explored whether doctoral psychology trainees’ personal cannabis use histories, perceptions of cannabis’ risks, and attitudes toward substance use would predict accurate diagnosis of cannabis use disorder. A series of t-tests revealed that trainees’ beliefs about the risks of cannabis use and attitudes toward substance use varied with history and recency of personal cannabis use. Additionally, partial correlation analyses revealed that doctoral psychology trainees’ perceptions of cannabis’ risks were negatively correlated with select attitudes toward substance use. Despite these findings, the study found that none of the attitudes explored significantly predicted diagnostic decisions among trainees. Additionally, contrary to study hypotheses, current cannabis use among doctoral psychology trainees increased the likelihood that trainees would accurately make a diagnosis of cannabis use disorder. Implications for graduate training, clinical practice, and public health are considered and recommendations for future research are provided.

Publication year: 2016

ISBN: 9781339822839

Advisor: Palmer, Laura K.

Committee members: Cole, Brian P.; Farrelly, Margaret Jones; Smith, John

University/institution: Seton Hall University

Department: Professional Psychology and Family Therapy

Connect with ADHS at AHA 2018 in Washington, D.C.!

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Today, historians begin descending upon wintry Washington, D.C., for the 2018 meeting of the American Historical Association. AHA is the largest annual gathering for such professionals and their affiliated societies. Among those represented again this year is the Alcohol and Drugs History Society, with two panels of original research and one roundtable discussion. The date, times, and location of those sessions are listed below. Points readers (and their interested friends!) are invited to meet historians active in the field and learn about their most recent projects. We hope to see you there!

Session 1: Transgressive Marijuana: Cultivating, Performing, and Regulating the Cannabis Culture in the 20th Century

Friday, January 5, 2018: 10:30 AM-12:00 PM
Roosevelt Room 2 (Marriott Wardman Park, Exhibition Level)Read More »

Travel as Research: A Historian’s Recent Trip to Huautla de Jiménez, Mexico

Editor’s Note: Today’s post was contributed by David Korostyshevsky, a PhD candidate in the University of Minnesota’s History of Science, Technology, and Medicine program. His research focuses on post-Enlightment discourses of intoxication and addiction in the Atlantic world. Contact him at koros003@umn.edu.

 

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Oaxaca City (all photos courtesy of the author)

As historians, we are used to traveling to attend academic conferences, visit libraries, and study in archives. But sometimes, we ought to travel just to see the places about which we are writing. I learned firsthand about how fruitful the unexpected results of such a trip can be earlier this year, when I traveled to Mexico City, Oaxaca City, and Huautla de Jiménez. Such travel yields sources and context otherwise inaccessible to the historian.

In 1957, Robert Gordon Wasson, a vice-president at JP Morgan, published an article in Life Magazine in which he described his discovery of and experience with hallucinogenic mushrooms in Mexico. He found these mushrooms in Huautla de Jiménez, a small village in the northern mountains of Oaxaca inhabited by indigenous Mazatec people. After several trips in the early 1950s, he was finally invited to participate in a ceremony led by a curandera María Sabina. His Mexican mushroom trip made a profound impression on him. Publishing extraordinary descriptions of it in Life, Wasson became an unwitting, and later, reluctant, stimulus for a nascent psychedelic counterculture in the twentieth century.Read More »

Points 2017: Teaching Drugs, Donald Trump’s “Oxy Electorate,” Opiate Addiction in Assam, and More!

This year was an exciting one for Points. We have enjoyed increasing traffic every year since we started in 2011, and 2017 was no exception with more unique visitors than any year prior! Below are some highlights from the past twelve months.


We began the year by sharing a series of perspectives on public drug discourse through the lens of historians, titled “What Historians Wish People Knew About Drugs.” Posts were written by contributors based largely on their remarks during a roundtable of the same name at the January American Historical Association meeting in Denver. Follow each link to read the four-part series by Miriam Kingsberg Kadia, Isaac Campos, William Rorabaugh, and Scott Taylor.
Read More »

Happy Holidays from Points!

We at Points hope you enjoyed the 2017 holiday season and wish you a happy 2018 to come. Later this week, we’ll highlight some of our most-viewed posts of the last twelve months. Thank you for your support of the blog; we’ll see you next year!
happyholidays

CFP: “Bodies That Eat, Bodies That Drink: Biocultural Approaches to Nutrition, Incorporation, and Commensality”

Call for Papers

Conference theme: “Bodies That Eat, Bodies That Drink: Biocultural Approaches to Nutrition, Incorporation, and Commensality”

Date: January 20, 2018
Location: Spain

Subject Fields: Anthropology, Art, Art History & Visual Studies, Literature, Public Health, Women’s & Gender History / Studies

The theme of 11th International Symposium of CORPUS will be “Bodies that eat, bodies that drink. Biocultural approaches to nutrition, incorporation and commensality”.

Consequently, we invite researchers (anthropologists, archaeologists, historians, philosophers, physicians, psychologists, sociologists, etc.) interested in the bodies that eat and drink to participate at this meeting, especially considering one of the following themes:

  • Cultures of the body that eat and drink: way of eating/drinking, positions and forms of involvement of the body during the eating/drinking processes, use of utensils, etc.
  • Sensory experiences and their cultural transcriptions: epistemology of sensory analysis, cultural use, control and lecture of facial expressions of disgust/satisfaction, biocultural dynamics of taste, etc.
  • Cultural, medical and psychological implications of food/drink incorporation: magic eating, placebo/nocebo, superfoods, ideal diets, aphrodisiac/anaphrodisiac foods, etc.
  • Dietetics paradigms and nutritional knowledges: ancient, traditional and biomedical dietetics conceptions, popular reception of academic nutritional knowledge, etc.
  • Cultural responses to the physiological consequences of food/drink incorporation: management of drunkenness and flush syndromes, aesthetic constructions of slim/fat bodies, material culture and representations of excretion, etc.
  • Eating disorders, malnutrition and their social and political readings.
  • Valorisation and demonization of drinks/foods within the framework of health politics:  forms, effectiveness and social consequences.
  • Gender approaches to forms of commensality, rituals of consumption, etc.
  • Representations of the bodies that eat or drink in arts and advertising.

Presentations will be preferably delivered in English. The proposals must include an abstract (400 words) and a current CV. The deadline for receiving presentation proposals is January 20th 2018. Please use the addresses provided below to send your proposal to Frédéric Duhart, Maria José García Soler y Paris Aguilar Piña. All proposals will be evaluated by an international scientific committee.

There will be no registration fee. Transportation, visa, travel insurance costs and accommodation will be the sole responsibility of each participant.

Contacts:

Frédéric Duhart
CORPUS General Coordinator
frederic.duhart@wanadoo.fr

Maria José García Soler
11th Symposium Coordinator
mj.garcia@ehu.eus

Paris Aguilar Piña
Scientific Committee Coordinator
papcomplex@gmail.com

 

Read More »

CFP Deadline Extended: “Dangerous Oral Histories: Risks, Responsibilities, and Rewards”

CALL FOR PAPERS
*The deadline for submission of proposals is now 10 January 2018.*

Oral History Society – 2018 Annual Conference
Theme:  Dangerous Oral Histories:  Risks, Responsibilities and Rewards

28 & 29 June, 2018
Queen’s University, Belfast

This joint conference of the Oral History Society and the Oral History Network of Ireland addresses the ethical and legal implications of oral history research. It presents a timely opportunity to explore the many issues raised by challenging projects, such as:

  • What is an acceptable level of risk for interviewees/interviewers in the oral history process?
  • What are the new responsibilities of the oral historian in a digital age?
  • What are the rewards for initiating ‘dangerous’ oral history projects on ‘difficult’ topics, and when do the risks outweigh them?

From this starting point, the conference organisers wish to solicit papers on all aspects of risk, responsibilities and rewards – and offer the following suggestions, whilst also welcoming other imaginative proposals addressing our theme of dangerous oral histories.

 Conference sub-themes include:Read More »

Points Bibliography: Interpreting Psilocybin and Peyote

Editor’s Note:  These entries are part of an ongoing drug-related dissertation bibliography being compiled by Jonathon Erlen. They were formerly published in the Social History of Alcohol and Drugs journal but are now periodically featured on the Points blog. For more information, contact Dr. Erlen through the link above.

Ego Death Resulting from Psilocybin Experiences: Exploring the Concept Within Mysticism

Author: Bobbett, Michelle

Abstract: The concept of ego-death was explored as a possible subset of mystical experience resulting from psilocybin mushroom ingestion. Participants in an online self-report study were asked to describe their most personally meaningful psilocybin experience, which they also must have deemed mystical or profound for inclusion in the study. Of the 350 total participants, 272 (77.7%) reported having an ego-death experience. This group had significantly higher scores on 27 of 30 items on the Mystical Experiences Questionnaire (MEQ: Maclean, Leoutsakos, Johnson, & Griffiths, 2012) and significantly differed in the form of psilocybin they ingested X 2 (1)= 11.02, p = .004 and dosage of psilocybin X 2 (1)= 13.58, p =.004, compared to those who did not report ego death. An exploratory factor analysis of the MEQ revealed similarities to the factors presented by MacLean (et al., 2012). Lastly, in line with the hypothesis of the study, the ego-death group had significantly higher scores than the non-ego-death group on the Time and Space and Mystical factor loadings. The results of the current study have implications for the practice of clinical psychology in general as well as the specific niche of psychedelic-assisted psychotherapies. The experience of ego-death and its potential for personal change, as revealed in the qualitative analysis, is especially relevant for practitioners of psychotherapy.Read More »

Ibogaine Treatment: A Psychedelic Approach to Addiction

aaaibogaineToday’s post was contributed by Aeden Smith-Ahearn, who once was a heroin addict for almost 7 years. After trying many different traditional methods to get off drugs, he decided to take a chance on Ibogaine treatment for his addiction. Now, 5 years later, Aeden is the treatment coordinator for a major Ibogaine clinic and he has helped hundreds of individuals find a new life through Ibogaine treatment.

When a highly recognized US medical doctor—the one prescribing opiates to patients on a daily basis—walks through the door of an Ibogaine clinic in Mexico to get treatment for his prescription pill addiction, the massive nature of America’s opioid dependence becomes clear—it affects everyone.

It’s not just doctors but lawyers, teachers, students, parents, CEOs, and the list goes on. Everyone, no matter what walk of life, is a target for opiate addiction. It is physically binding, psychologically confining, and, in almost every instance, impossible to break on your own.Read More »