Conference Summary: “I’ve Been to Dwight,” July 14-18, 2016, Dwight, IL

Editor’s Note: This conference summary is brought to you by David Korostyshevsky, a doctoral student in the History of Science, Technology, and Medicine at the University of Minnesota. He traveled to Dwight, Illinois, in mid-July to attend the ADHS off-year “I’ve Been to Dwight” conference, and has provided this account of his time there. Thanks David!

On July 14-18, 2016, a group of international alcohol and drug historians descended upon the village of Dwight, Illinois, for an ADHS off-year conference. Conference organizers selected Dwight because 2016 marks the 50th anniversary of the closing of the Keeley Institute.

Founded by Leslie E. Keeley in 1879 (and operating until 1966), the Keeley Institute offered treatment options to patients with addiction, usually alcoholism, including Keeley’s Gold Cure. “I’ve Been to Dwight,” the conference title, references “a catchphrase” former Keeley Institute patients “used to explain their sobriety.”

Keeley

To make it easier to read, this summary is organized thematically. You can see the full conference program here.

I live-tweeted the conference as @rndmhistorian under the hashtag #IBTD16. Also, Janet Olson, volunteer archivist at the Frances Willard Historical Association wrote a blog post about the conference.

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Online Video Resources for Alcohol, Drug, and Addiction History

Talks from Addictions Old and New (October 22-23, 2017) and the National History Center Congressional Briefing on the History of Drug Policy and Addiction (May 9, 2016) are available online. The videos include PowerPoint slides, enlarged and edited for clarity, and follow-up questions.

Addictions Old and New, which Kyle Bridge first reported in an October 27, 2015 Points story, brought together scholars from different disciplines to discuss traditional and emerging patterns of addictive behavior. The videos feature neuroscientist Chuck O’Brien, historian David Courtwright, historian Virginia Berridge, historian David Herzberg, addiction medicine specialist Andrew Kolodny, cultural anthropologist Natasha Dow Schüll, social worker and sex-addiction expert Robert Weiss, behavioral pharmacologist and tobacco expert Robert Balster, policy analyst Mark Kleiman, and historian David Leary.

Screenshot 2016-06-23 09.54.13

Cultural anthropologist Natasha Dow Schüll was among the featured speakers at Addictions Old and New. She spoke on Addiction by Design: From Slot Machines to Candy Crush.

Screenshot 2016-06-23 09.56.03

Moderator Alan Kraut (left) kicked off the National History Center Congressional Briefing on the History of Drug Policy and Addiction, which featured an overview of U.S. drug-policy history by David Courtwright and an analysis of the origins of the opioid epidemic by Keith Wailoo (right). Historian Dane Kennedy summarized and commented on the presentations.

 

A Report from the 2015 Annual Meeting of the American Historical Society

Editor’s Note: Today contributing editor Bob Beach reports on several drug-related panels at this year’s annual meeting of the AHA, which took place in New York on January 2-5, 2015.

This year, the American Historical Society’s annual meeting was held in Times Square in New York City. Among the 1,500 presenters, a refreshing batch of young drug and alcohol historians (and some veterans) presented their research on addiction, addiction treatment, and the long drug war.

Calling all drug and alcohol historians
Calling all drug and alcohol historians

The historical significance of this time and place was not lost on your correspondent in his first foray into the world of the AHA annual meeting. Eric Schneider reminded us on the first day of the conference that the 100 year anniversary of the Harrison Act was coming into force. The law launched the national drug war in the United States and was, in many ways, on the minds of all of “our” presenters at the conference.Read More »

Doing Drugs (History) at the AAHM

The annual conference for the American Association for the History of Medicine kicks off this Thursday, and there are several great alcohol and drugs history events on the docket this year. You can join the conversation about them on the association’s new-and-improved conference website and blog.

Chicago, here we come!
Chicago, here we come!

On Friday at noon, Points represents at a lunchtime panel on Blogging the History of Medicine. I’m co-chairing the panel with Jacki Antonovich of Nursing Clio; we’ll be in conversation with Nathaniel Comfort of Genotopia, Elizabeth Mullen of the National Library of Medicine’s Circulating Now, and Lisa O’Sullivan of the New York Academy of Medicine’s Books, Health, and History. Our discussion will focus on the hows of blogging, not the whys.

You might also want to check out:

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Call for Proposals: Criminal Justice/Legal History @ SSHA

Editor’s note: The Points symposium marking the 40th anniversary of David F. Musto’s The American Disease will continue on Monday. In the meantime, friends of the ADHS call our attention to the following CFP:

The Criminal Justice/Legal History network of the Social Science History Association is soliciting panel and paper proposals for the 38th annual meeting of the SSHA, November 21-24, 2012, in Chicago, Illinois. Panels and individual papers on any topic of interest to scholars of Criminal Justice/Legal History are welcome. Proposals connected to the overall conference theme, “Organizing Powers,” and panels organized around recently published books, are encouraged. Themes of particular interest include the carceral state, policing resistance, juvenile crime then and now, exporting U.S. Constitutionalism, and crime and political protest around the world.

The deadline for submissions is February 15, 2013. For more information on the meeting as well as the general call for proposals, refer to the SSHA website. More on how to submit proposals after the jump.

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Call for Proposals: ADHS @ AHA

The Alcohol and Drugs History Society hope that any members or interested scholars will put together proposals for papers or panels for the next annual meeting of the American Historical Association (AHA). This meeting will be in Washington D.C. from January 2-5, 2014. Panels or papers that are not accepted by the AHA will be considered for inclusion in our own affiliate meetings. The deadline for submitting papers and panels to the AHA is February 15. The complete information on submitting a panel or paper can be found at the following link: Call for Proposals: American Historical Association.

For proposals that are rejected by the AHA or are submitted later than February 15, 2013, please contact W. Scott Haine and Emily Dufton at the following emails: shaine@aol.com and ebdufton@gwmail.gwu.edu.

Thank you very much for your consideration and best of luck!

Call for papers: Under control?: alcohol and drug regulation, past and present

Papers and panel proposals are invited for an international conference on the history of alcohol and drug regulation to be held in Bristol, UK 21st-23rd June 2013.

The conference will explore all aspects of drug, tobacco and alcohol regulation. Work covering all periods and places, including recent history, will be considered.

Confirmed keynote speakers:

Professor Virginia Berridge (London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine)
Professor Paul Gootenberg (State University of New York)
Professor James Simpson (Carlos III University of Madrid)

Panel proposals (3 x 20-minute papers) or individual papers (20 minutes) are invited.  We will also consider proposals for fringe sessions using non-conventional formats e.g. screenings, debates etc.

Subjects may include (but are not limited to):

  • Global drugs trade and the war on drugs
  • Crime and policing
  • Prohibition
  • Tobacco control
  • Regulation of drugs in art, film and literature
  • Temperance and its influences
  • Alcohol licensing and pricing
  • Media regulation / advertising and marketing
  • Religion and alcohol or drugs
  • Dependency and treatment
  • Policymaking and the political process
  • Alcohol and radical politics / revolutions / social movements
  • Use and control of drugs in premodern cultures
  • Alcohol and drugs in sport and popular culture

Proposal formats:

Panel sessions: brief abstracts (c. 200 words) of each paper plus a brief statement (c. 200 words) outlining the panel theme and a brief biography of participants.

Single papers: brief abstract (c. 200 words) and brief biography

Fringe events: Outline of proposed event (up to 500 words) including proposed content, technical requirements and rationale.

Please send all proposals to undercontrol2013@gmail.com

Deadline for submission: 30th September 2012 

For more information, go to the conference website

Conference Announcement: Multidisciplinary Approaches to Plants and Religion

The Working Group on Plants and Religion at the University of Florida (UF) is hosting a symposium entitled “Multidisciplinary Approaches to Plants and Religion,” to be held 15-17 December 2011.  The symposium will explore human-plant relationships in the realm of the sacred.  Of special interest this year is the religious use of psychoactive plants, but there will be several sessions to encourage and welcome participants from a broad range of perspectives on the religious use of plants.

◊◊ Keynote Speakers ◊◊

Bia Labate

Bia Labate: Beatriz Caiuby Labate has a Ph.D. in Social Anthropology from the Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Brazil. Her main areas of interest are the study of psychoactive substances, drug policies, shamanism, ritual, and religion. Since 2009, she has been a Research Associate at the Institute of Medical Psychology, Heidelberg University. She is also researcher with the Nucleus for Interdisciplinary Studies of Psychoactives (NEIP), and editor of its website. She is author, co-author, and co-editor of eight books, two in English translation, and one journal special edition. Her book, A Reinvenção do Uso da Ayahuasca nos Centros Urbanos (The Reinvention of Ayahuasca Use in Urban Centers, Mercado de Letras, 2004), was derived from  her Master’s thesis, which received the prize for Best Thesis in Social Sciences from the National Association for Graduate Studies in Social Science (ANPOCS) in 2000. For more information, see her website.

Edward MacRae

Edward MacRae was born in Sao Paulo and raised in Great Britain, where he graduated in Social Psychology from the University of Sussex and received a master’s degree in Sociology of Latin America from the University of Essex. Back in Brazil, he studied anthropology at Unicamp and USP, completing his doctorate in 1986 with the dissertation “The militant homosexual in post-dictatorship Brazil.” Since then he has researched a range of drugs topics, initially at the Institute of Social Medicine and Criminology of the state of Sao Paulo–IMESC— and in the Program for Orientation and Attendance of Drug-dependencies– PROAD/EPM. A former member of the Sao Paulo State Narcotics Council, he currently teaches anthropology at the Federal University of Bahia, and works with the Center for Drug Abuse Studies and Therapy – CETAD/UFBA.  He is a representative of the Ministry of Culture on the National Anti-Drugs Council and a member of its Scientific-Technical Advisory Chamber. He has written books on sexuality, social movements, and the socially integrated use of psychoactive substances and harm reduction associated to the use of drugs.

◊◊ Outline of Sessions ◊◊Read More »